Minimizing Conditions for Legionella and Other Bacteria in Plumbing Systems
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Minimizing Conditions for Legionella and Other Bacteria in Plumbing Systems by Matthew R. Freije

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Published by HC Information Resources Inc. .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Nonfiction / General

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatUnknown Binding
Number of Pages80
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL12302881M
ISBN 101930488335
ISBN 109781930488335

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  Arguably, one of the best approaches for minimizing the risk of Legionella in a building plumbing system is to try to prevent it from occurring in the first place. Design strategies can be coupled with good operational and maintenance practices and a secondary disinfection program to effectively prevent a problem before it begins.   It is good to know that the risk of having Legionella bacteria in your water system goes up with some of the following conditions: The water temperature in your plumbing system is not high enough; Your water distribution system has low flow areas, where water is .   Kemper has Developed an Innovative Solution for Minimizing Legionella Bacteria in Building Water Systems. By: Ron George, CPD, President, Plumb-Tech Design & Consulting Services LLC, There is a relatively new product on the market that is being sold by Kemper Industries. It allows a plumbing system design that flows or circulates cold and hot water right .   Disinfection systems can be installed in a building’s plumbing to minimize Legionella bacteria in the water delivered to faucets, showers, and drinking fountains.

  A Legionella management plan must include preventive measures for all water systems that present a significant risk of Legionella growth and transmission, not just for plumbing systems. Minimizing Legionella bacteria within plumbing systems involves much more than water temperatures (see Figure 1 above). Out in the wild 2. Sources and distribution of the Legionella risk Legionella enters buildings as a bacterium found in very low concentrations in lakes and rivers. It is not completely eliminated by chlorination or other water treatment systems. Legionella grows in warm water (above 20 C). The ideal growth range is 35 C to 45 C. The organism is killed above 65 C. According to a recent press release, in controlled hydraulic conditions, the researchers developed a “model system” that allowed them to measure biofilm formation as well as Legionella bacteria growth that had been “exposed to drinking water without disinfectant.” This system allowed them to compare two different water supply systems. Written by: Michael Groh, U.S. Water. Minimizing the risks associated with Legionella bacteria in building water systems can be challenging, and without the right expertise, it may put your facility at an increased risk for Legionella associated infections. In June of , the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standards Committee approved the .

Standard Guidance to Help Minimize the Risk of Legionellosis. ANSI/ASHRAE Standard , Legionellosis: Risk Management for Building Water Systems establishes minimum legionellosis risk management requirements for building water systems.. The brand new edition clarifies compliance requirements, and is updated throughout with enforceable, code-intended language to . "Stagnant or standing water in a plumbing system can increase the risk for growth and spread of Legionella and other biofilm-associated bacteria," the CDC said. "Ensure that your water system is.   If you raise the temperature of the hot water above °, you start to kill off Legionella bacteria. The higher the water temperature, the faster you kill the bacteria. New standards mitigate risk. Admittedly, the plumbing codes are having a difficult time trying to regulate these areas. Legionella and Legionnaires’ disease. Stagnant or standing water in a plumbing system can increase the risk for growth and spread of Legionella and other biofilm-associated bacteria. When water is stagnant, hot water temperatures can decrease to the Legionella growth range (77–°F, 25–42°C). Stagnant water can also lead to low or undetectable levels of disinfectant, such as chlorine.